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Programmes

Timor Leste

East Timor or Timor-Leste (Democratic Republic of East Timor or Timor Leste) is an island on the Indonesian archipelago 300 miles north of Austraia, between the islands of Java (East) and New Guinea (West). It is the biggest Sundaland island.
During colonisation it was split in two: the Western part joined the Dutch East Indies, which would become Indonesia. The Eastern part was annexed by Portugal, which left in 1975. East Timor proclaimed its independence, but was invaded seven days later by the Indonesian army. During 25 years of occupation, Indonesia carried out a policy of bloody repression of opposition elements. More than 250,000 East Timorese died in the fighting and orchestrated famines. Vast plans of migration from the over-populated islands of Java and Sumatra were initiated, aiming to supplant native numbers. In 1998, General Suharto, President of Indonesia, was pushed to resign because of popular demonstrations. His successor, Habibi, conceded to East Timor the right to hold a self-determination referendum under the aegis of the UN, on 30 August 1999. Despite the violence accompanying this consultation, more than 78% of Timorese voted in favour of independence. The Indonesian army and Timorese militia withdrew violently from the country, and Timor was placed in October 1999 under the transitional administrative management of the UN. The country became officially independent on 20th May 2002, and presidential elections took place. Four years after achieving full sovereignty, East Timor was again hit by violent conflict, internal this time, causing massive population displacement across the country.

East Timor is concentrating today on political and economic stabilisation. Twelve years after gaining independence and after several violent episodes, in 2012 the Timorese elected for the third time their president as well as members of their national parliament. After more than 12 years, the UN mission (UNMIT) and the International Stabilization Force (ISF) left the country at the end of 2012. Despite significant oil resources, 50% of East Timorese live below the poverty line on $0.88 per day. Agriculture still occupies and feeds 70% of the population, and malnutrition rates remain high (close to half of children suffer from under-nourishment). Weak infrastructure makes daily life in the provinces particularly difficult. For some regions, the bad state of the roads, the absence of electricity and drinking water are still a problem, and restrict access to health, education and work. The centralisation of resources (higher education, telecommunications, transport, employment, health…) has increased the problem of exodus towards the capital (an increase of 87% inhabitants in 20 years) and above all the feeling of isolation and abandonment in the rest of the country. East Timor has experienced since independence significant demographic growth, even reaching the highest fertility rate in the world since 2002 with an average of 7.2 children per woman.

Triangle Génération Humanitaire has been in East Timor since 2004. An evaluation conducted at the end of 2004 enabled the launching of programme at the end of 2005 for access to water and sanitation in areas of the country affected by malnutrition. In 2006, when the crisis broke out, TGH had been already working for more than a year on reconstruction and development for a country that was then the youngest in the world. With its experience in similar emergency situations, TGH therefore quickly launched a water and sanitation access and hygiene awareness project, for 6,000 people in refugee camps, in partnership with the Norwegian NGO NRC. The relation of trust built with the National Water Agency since 2007 enabled TGH to be appointed to carry out an exhaustive study on the Manatuto District water network. Following this study, other programmes of greater magnitude were carried out in close partnership with local NGOs working in the sector. In parallel to this work in the water sector, TGH is working in the Protection and Social sector and has carried out in particular a psycho social programme in the Becora quarter in Dili, with the aim of recreating social links between the host population and people displaced due to conflict. This project runs a youth centre in partnership with a local association, and organises different activities (English language training, sports tournaments, music groups, painting…). TGH launched in October 2013 another three-year programme in this sector, with the objective of helping local actors working in protection of women and children victims of domestic violence.

Current programmes

European Union – Timor-Leste Cooperation 2015

Towards strengthening civil society for a better protection of women and children victims of violence

The violent occupation and intensity of the conflict for independence, achieved in 2002, left significant scars, particularly in terms of behaviour against women and children.

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 Area of expertise

Psycho-Social

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 10 812 people
 Duration: 40 months 10/2013 - 01/2017
 Budget: €797,910

 Funding

Logo EuropeAid-commission-europeenne Logo Fondation Raja   UN
  • Funding: 75% EuropeAid (European Union), RAJA-Marcovici Foundation, Ambassade de France en Indonésie et au Timor oriental
  • Timorese State partners: Secretary of State for the Promotion of Equality (SEPI), Ministry of Social Solidarity (MSS).
  • Local partners: PRADET (Psychosocial Recovery and Development in East Timor), Casa Vida, Rede Feto and FOKUPERS (The Communication Forum for East Timorese Women).

Gender-based violence is widespread. According to a UNDP survey, nearly 40% of women are victims of violence, and 86% of women and 81% of men believe that a husband has a legitimate right to beat his wife.

For some years now, the government has been trying to improve the mechanisms of protection of women and children at risk and to stem violence. In July 2010, a law against domestic violence was enacted, and a support network for the victims, involving State departments and civil society actors; was established. However, their rights are still ignored, and access to legal aid is very limited.

These actors need to strengthen their skills and abilities in the management of structures and in social and psychological support to the victims. The cooperation between the State and civil society must be strengthened and community awareness should be increased. There is currently no academic training in the social area. Social workers rely on their own experience and have no theoretical bases in the psychosocial area or in project management.

Triangle Generation Humanitarian works together with four local associations and with Timorese authorities. The implemented action plan includes sessions of theoretical and practical training at organizational, financial and technical levels. Improved support for victims is based on the training of social workers on prevention, care and psychological support, on the development and standardization of common tools to monitor care, and on specific activities to support reintegration.

In order to raise awareness among Timorese on the rights of women and children, and to better inform them about the existing protection mechanisms in the country and in the districts, a strategy was developed for local actors and the public, based on advocacy and communication on change in behaviour. Training is also provided to key actors dealing with the victims (local district authorities, government employees).

Presentation of the 4 Timorese partner associations:

FOKUPERS
Founded in 1997, 45 employees.
The association implements advocacy activities, provides assistance and a safe place to women, and organizes information and awareness-raising sessions within the communities.

REDE FETO
Founded in 2000, 8 employees.
Rede Feto is a network of 24 local associations of women seeking gender equality and women’s empowerment via lobbying activities, networking and capacity building. Rede Feto organizes advocacy activities, conducts working groups on women issues, and builds the capacity of member organizations.

PRADET
Founded in 2002, 27 employees.
PRADET provides psychosocial care for victims, has a "safe room" in the hospital for women victims of violence in Dili, and sets up a support programme for young people sentenced by the courts. The association works in partnership with local actors (Ministry of Health, the police, NGOs and churches).

Casa Vida
Founded in 2008, 22 employees.
A Brazilian association which currently manages two emergency and rehabilitation shelters for under-age girls victims of violence. Casa Vida hosts 45 girls and the duration of this support varies from 1 month to 2 years. The association has also created a pilot coffee shop where some young girls are trained in cooking and catering.

Completed Programmes

Improving water and sanitation services in rural areas of Timor-Leste

This program covers the Oecusse enclave, where the situation is most critical, only 10 to 15% of the population having access to sanitation facilities, and 14.8% to drinking water resources.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 10,147 people
 Duration: 39 months 05/2011 - 08/2014
 Budget: €1,573,040

 Funding

Logo EuropeAid-commission-europeenne Logo AFD Logo Fondation-entreprise-sogelink
  • Funding: EuropeAid (European Commission), AFD (Agence Française de Développement), Sogelink Foundation
  • Partners: National Directorate of Water and Sanitation Services, NTF (Naroman Timor Foun), Timorese NGO

Since its first survey mission in 2004, Triangle G H has developed several programs on drinking water supply and sanitation in different regions of the country.

This program covers the Oecusse enclave, where the situation is most critical, only 10 to 15% of the population having access to sanitation facilities, and 14.8% to drinking water resources.

For the 13 villages identified and selected as part of this project, with an estimated total population of 10,147 inhabitants, the coverage is 2% for sanitation facilities, and 20% for drinking water resources.

The preparatory phase aiming at updating and verifying social data and selected technical choices has been carried out, which resulted in a participatory definition of the implementation of activities in each village.

The program then will unfold around three core areas:

Improving access to water:

  • Set-up and/or strengthening of local water management committees  and training of the latter;
  • Identification and protection of water resources;
  • Sizing and designing of infrastructures, purchase of equipment and rehabilitation / construction of water supply networks;
  • Control of water quality and quantity in collaboration with the water and sanitation services.

Improving the sanitary environment with an increased access to basic sanitary infrastructures and the development of the knowledge and good practices related to hygiene:

  • Running of Knowledge, Attitude, Practices (KAP) surveys, definition of hygiene messages and hygiene awareness sessions (20 per village and per year);
  • Implementation of a Total Sanitation Piloted by the Community (TSPC) approach for the construction of 1,100 family latrines;
  • Selection of vulnerable beneficiaries according to predetermined criteria, and construction of sanitary facilities.

Capacity building of the actors in charge of equipment:

  • Designing of a matrix of the responsibilities on the maintenance of water infrastructures and definition of a training course together with the water and sanitation services, the communities and the local partner NGO;
  • Running of technical training for the water management committees, the local partner and the water and sanitation services;
  • Monitoring, support and assessment of measures taken by the actors in charge of the maintenance and repair of the water networks.

Support Caméa Vocational Training

Support Caméa Vocational Training in Partnership with SEFOPE (Secretary of State for Vocational Training and Employment).

 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures


 Duration: 12 months 09/2010 - 12/2011
 Budget: K€ 54

 Funding

Norwegian funds

Improve Living Conditions of Rural Populations in Covalima District

The objective of the project is to improve the living conditions of rural populations in Covalima district by building and/or rehabilitating the potable water network and improving hygiene and sanitation conditions in the area.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures


 Duration: 10 months 10/2010 - 09/2011
 Budget: Approximately K€700

 Funding

Australian Aid / Besik
  • Funding: Australian Aid / Besik

Results anticipated:

  • Provide access to water for the residents of Covalima, in compliance with international standards in terms of quantity and quality;
  • Raise hygiene and sanitation standards;
  • Provide target communities with the technical skills to maintain the water network equipment on a daily basis;
  • Strengthen the competences of national authorities regards potable water networks management.

Activities

  • For the network:
    - Discuss and communicate with communities
    - Identify needs, technical surveys, networks design
    - Draft and publish call for tenders for provision of material
    - Perform rehabilitation and/or construction of water networks
    - Link piping

  • For sanitation:
    - Mobilise communities through the CLTS (Community-led total sanitation)
    - Supply material for construction of latrines for most vulnerable people
    - Technical support and guidance
    - Hygiene promotion

  • Community training:
    - Implement committees in communities
    - Identify relay (key) people
    - Provide theoretical and practical training
    - Supply spare parts

  • Strengthen competencies:
    - Train the local partner: community mobilisation, technical competencies, project follow-up and evaluation
    - Guide and train the DNSAS (the decentralised national water department of the district) in various areas:
    - Technical: topographic surveys, water quality test, hydraulic training, infrastructures design, etc.
    - Organisational: project cycle, monitoring, storage, etc.

TL/Cova Lima : TGH inaugure son projet de développement rural

Implementation of a sustainable water distribution system in rural areas.

The project objective is to improve the living conditions of rural populations in Oecusse and Manatuto districts by building and/or rehabilitating the potable water distribution systems.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures


 Duration: 17 months 05/2009 - 09/2010
 Budget: K€ 1 300

 Funding

CDM
  • Funding: CDM
  • Amount of beneficiaries: : the population of Oecusse and Manatuto districts (the precise number of beneficiaries will be defined in line with the villages selected by TGH and partners)

Expected results:

  • The inhabitants of Oecusse and Manatuto districts have access to water that is conform international standards in terms of quantity and quality,
  • The communities of Oecusse and Manatuto have the knowledge and technical capacity to maintain the equipment and water network on a daily basis,
  • The national authorities’ water network management skills  are strengthened.

Activities 

  • For the network
    Consultation with the communities,
    Specific identification of needs, technical studies, design of networks
    Writing and publication of a call for tenders on supply of equipment
    Rehabilitation works and/or construction of water networks,
    Connection.

  • Community training
    Implementation of a water committee in the communities,
    Identification of intermediaries (« relay people »),
    Practical and theoretical training,
    Supply of spare-parts.

  • Skills strengthening
    The local partner will received trained about mobilizing the community, technical skills, project follow-up and evaluation,
    Guidance and training of the DNSAS at various levels:
    - Technical (topographic surveys, water quality testing, hydraulic training, infrastructures design, etc.)
    - Organization: project cycle, follow-up, storage, etc

Support victims of the Timor Leste crisis by helping to reduce intercommunity conflicts

The aim of the project is to participate in reducing community and cross-community tensions in the area of Becora (Dili).

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 Area of expertise

Psycho-Social

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 18 545 personnes
 Duration: 19 months 07/2008 - 01/2010
 Budget: 274 K€

 Funding

Logo ECHO Logo MAE
  • Funding: DAH (Délégation à l’action humanitaire, French Foreign Affairs Ministry), ECHO (Humanitarian Aid service of the European Commission), JM Bruneau Foundation

Amount of beneficiaries: : 1,795 people (direct beneficiaries), 16,750 people (indirect beneficiaries).

The aim of the project is to participate in reducing community and cross-community tensions in the area of Becora (Dili). More specifically, we aim to strengthen social relations in the communities and across communities by implementing and supporting cultural, socio-educational, sports and income-generating activities.

Expected results are:

  • Activities are regularly carried out at the youth center
  • The return of displaced people to Becora is boosted by social and cultural activities implemented by TGH for young people and women.

Activities implemented:

Our action focuses on two main areas:

  • Support and capacity building of the youth center
  • Activities targeted directly at the communities

Activities related to Result 1 : Activities are regularly carried out at the youth center

Since July 4, 2009, TGH has been using an office located just behind the youth center to coordinate the national and expatriate team working on the project. In addition, owing to its proximity with the youth center, the office can serve as a meeting and training space for direct work with the youth center.

Activities carried out with the youth center:

  • Help the Youth Department organize sports and cultural events
  • Help the Youth Department develop the « music » activity
  • Help the Youth Department manage IT training and English and Portuguese language classes
  • Strengthen the management capacities of the center regards yearly programming of training courses
  • Strengthen the management capacities of the center regards fund raising

Activities related to Result 2: The return of displaced people to Becora is boosted by social and cultural activities implemented by TGH for young people and women.

  • Strengthen and follow projects that already exist (manual and cultural activities) and that can be integrated in a psychosocial process. 
  • Develop « open sessions »: steered by the activity groups, such sessions are open to the community (population categories such as women, teenagers, children).

"Peace Building in Timor Leste: a third way?"

Xavier Besnard - Programme Manager TGH - Timor-Leste

In 2010, Timor Leste will have to deal with the social aspects of the reintegration process.  This most challenging process means addressing the deep structural difficulties attached to the reintegration of returnees, as well as the residual obstacles triggered by the 2006 crisis.

Firstly, Timor Leste is one of the poorest countries in the world. 50% of its population currently lives with under $0.88/day. Due to structural poverty, people in Timor Leste have great difficulty accessing livelihood, jobs and social facilities, especially in Dili.
Indeed, since 1999, the population of Dili has grown spectacularly from 100.715 to 173.541, increasing the pressure on natural and economical resources. According to Neupert and Lopes, around 50% of this growth is the result of major internal migrations. (The demographic components of the crisis in Timor Leste - 2006). In such a context, when working on the return of IDPs, it is important to address the structural lack of social and economical resources and to compose with unemployment-related frustrations.

Secondly, the justice system’s flaws generate a culture of impunity by making it impossible to prosecute those considered responsible for burning houses, chasing people and occupying properties in 2006. Returnees now have to face a neighbourhood community that is sometimes unreceptive, in a situation that appears dominated by frustrated justice.
Furthermore, the national administration is still young and cannot yet manage disputes generated by land and property issues. Indeed, even if a new land law should be voted in the next weeks, land issues remain extremely complex in Timor Leste due to the historical lack of land policies and the successive occupations and displacements of the population. Facts reveal that “normal restitution” of houses takes time and that it is far from being complete. According to IDMC’s December report, by November 2009 the cadastral information programme supported by USAID had recorded 5,800 land claims in 6 districts.

In addition, many youth groups, particularly in Dili, have a strong sway over the growing level of violence. According to the TLAVA Project report, the amount of Martial Arts Groups (MAG) has escalated in recent years. There are allegedly 20,000 members currently registered – and probably at least as many unregistered members. The influence of MAGs extends over at least 13 districts and Dili appears to be their main battleground. Based on the analysis of TLAVA, MAG disputes embody communal ones as each community mobilizes its youth to end its territory. When one family uses a MAG to attack another family, in return, MAG members from other families or extended families become involved. Thus, a family dispute can become a gang conflict. Within the reintegration process, because issues surrounding properties and resources directly impact the communities' acceptance of returning IDPs, it is important to keep in mind the destabilisation potential of Youth conflicts.

Such factors of tension intensify the risk of local conflict in Timor Leste, especially in Dili. By exacerbating new types of social antagonism, such tensions directly impact the political reconciliation process that is officially underway in Timor Leste. These social tensions appear between hosted and returned people but more generally between the communities themselves.

Since 2007, in order to facilitate the return of IDPs, several institutions and humanitarian agencies have explored two key areas of conflict mitigation activities:

  1. Conflict resolution through case-by-case mediation activities
  2. Dialogue initiatives between local leaders and civil society through conflict prevention training

We believe that mediation and local leader training strategies are indispensable but could be improved with a more inclusive approach. The peace building process could be strengthened with special emphasis placed on enhancing the role of the community itself, not only that of leaders or individuals involved in a particular dispute.

In the current framework, specific actions focused on strengthening social cohesion at grass roots level could be further developed, and new alternative approaches could be explored with regards to reconciliation-based activities.

Several interviews with chiefs of Sucos with high rates of returned households revealed that punctual strategies (such as mediation activities) or specific strategies (such as dialogue with the local leaders) have real but incomplete results. Authorities of these Sucos expressed their wish to see the entire community involved on a deeper level and more sustainably through extended peace-building activities.

While conflict resolution initiatives based on case-by-case mediation activities can theoretically achieve sustainable local integration (by solving disputes one by one), we believe that local integration initiatives for IDPs can also be a good solution to build peaceful relationships.

By local integration, we mean community-based initiatives that mixed individuals from different groups around regular and common activities. This approach does not directly solve specific problems such as land or property issues, however it provides means, capacities and facilities to the community groups able to develop inclusive local initiatives.

Local integration strategy implies targeting both returnees and host communities, therefore building a global community-based approach. It means that returnees should no longer be identified as a group of concern. This implies providing equal access to livelihoods and humanitarian services. Although it seems clear that some of the root causes of the social tensions can be addressed by the political channel, through justice, security or land reforms, a great part of the solution consists in strengthening social cohesion to convince people that they can move on, create and achieve local projects together.

The selection of local groups able to involve their community in collective and creative projects can be a powerful and positive way to stimulate social ties. Supporting local groups of activity (such as painting, handicraft, sewing) that are based on participation and spread an inclusive message is a way to promote peace. Such groups currently embody the future of a unified and reconciled Timor Leste. Supporting, promoting and guiding community initiatives that already exist in a young state can powerfully boost the reconciliation process.

Thus, peacebuilding strategies should be extended at the psychosocial level. This consists in encouraging and supporting collective grass-roots projects offering activities that empower openness and non-discrimination. Such experiences have already revealed their impact at local level. Of course, supporting these groups requires specific methodologies in order to prevent and address issues related to constitution and sustainability of the groups.

We believe that within the current national recovery process, this type of inclusive action should be strengthened and valued as a possible “third way” in the global peace building strategy.

Water and sanitation for internally displaced people in transitional housing sites

This project aims to offer emergency relief to people impacted by the crisis in Timor-Leste. In particular we will provide safe and reliable water and sanitation (WatSan) services to internally displaced populations (IDPs) currently living in transitional shelter sites.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 9,272 people
 Duration: 8 months 06/2008 - 04/2009
 Budget: K€ 380

 Funding

Logo ECHO Logo MAE
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid service of the European Commission), DAH (Délégation à l’action humanitaire – French Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

Expected results:

  • IDPs in the transitional shelter camps have access to a sufficient amount of good quality water
  • IDPs in the transitional shelter camps have access to sanitary facilities (showers, latrines, clothes-washing points)
  • The camps offer better living conditions, and people’s awareness about safe hygiene benefits and practices is improved.

TGH works in coordination with other humanitarian organizations, particularly the NRC(Norwegian Refugee Council) and the Government of Timor-Leste, to ensure that all needs are met.

Activites:

  • Build water networks
  • Connect water networks to the town network, or to wells (65 m) if the town network is deficient and the aquifer allows it 
  • Support maintenance of all current facilities in the transition camps(empowerment of established water committees and creation of new ones)
  • Monitor quantity and quality of water
  • Build sanitary facilities (latrines, showers and clothes-washing points)
  • Connect sanitary facilities to the water network and drainage system for wastewaters disposal
  • Build and/or repair drainage systems to limit waterborne diseases
  • Run hygiene-awareness campaigns in the new transitional camps and supply hygiene kits
  • Finalise the technical plans and scope of the facilities in relation to the various results.

Emergency assistance to the population affected by the crisis in East Timor (water and sanitary facilities)

For these last two projects the activities are undertaken in coordination with other aid agencies in order to respond to the uncovered needs, and more specifically with the NRC (Norwegian Refugee Council) and the Government of East Timor.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 3 000 people
 Duration: 10 months 07/2007 - 06/2008
 Budget: K€ 225

 Funding

Logo MAE
  • Funding: French "Délégation à l’action humanitaire", (French Ministry of Foreign Affairs), TGH funds

The implemented activities are :

  • Construction of water networks,
  • Construction of sanitary facilities: latrines, showers and washing points,
  • Construction of new and rehabilitation of existing drainage systems for storm and gray water,
  • Implementation of awareness sessions on good hygiene practices and public health issues,
  • Hygiene kits distribution,
  • Identification and training of the water system and sanitary facilities maintenance team,
  • Maintenance kit and spare parts distribution.

The objective of the project is to improve the displaced people's living conditions in Dili District and in particular to provide safe and reliable water and sanitation (WatSan) services to IDPs for 4 transitional shelter sites.

Water and sanitation support to internally displaced people in transitional housing sites in Dili district

The project's objective is to respond to the humanitarian needs of the population of Timor Leste affected by the internal crisis and in particular: to provide safe and reliable water and sanitation (WatSan) services to IDPs for 4 transitional shelter sites.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 3 240 people
 Duration: 9 months 06/2007 - 02/2008
 Budget: K€ 221

 Funding

Logo ECHO
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid service of the European Commission)

As a consequence of the renewed violence erupted in Dili in April and May 2006, over 20,000 people lost their homes. The violent clashes, led to total or partial destruction of over 4,000 homes in Dili district (Source UNDP Timor Leste, Dec 2006) and led to a growing population of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs).
In May 2007, 4,000 of those that lost homes reside in temporary tent shelters in the IDP camps considered to have the most compromised living conditions and most adversely affecting the surrounding population.
The Government of Timor-Leste, with the support of international NGOS has started building transitional shelters for the families who lost their homes while more permanent housing solutions are developed. Triangle Generation Humanitaire has been asked to participate in providing water and sanitation solutions and has received support from the Humanitarian Aid Service of the European Commission (ECHO) to do so.

In this project the activities are undertaken in coordination with other aid agencies in order to respond to the uncovered needs, and more specifically with the NRC (Norwegian Refugee Council) and the Government of East Timor. The action was undertaken in 4 transitional shelters sites in and around the capital city, Dili: Tibar, Tasi-Tolu, Quarantina et Becora Market.

The implemented activities are:

  • Construction of water networks
  • Construction of sanitary facilities: latrines, showers and washing points
  • Construction of new and rehabilitation of existing drainage systems for storm and gray water
  • Implementation of awareness sessions on good hygiene practices and public health issues
  • Hygiene kits distribution
  • Identification and training of the water system and sanitary facilities maintenance team
  • Maintenance kit and spare parts distribution

The expected results of the project have been reached and even surpassed. Therefore the displaced people who have moved to these transitional housing sites now benefit from:

  • A good quality and sufficient quantity of water: the response brought by the implemented action are above the minimum required by Sphere standard in terms of available quantity of water per day and per person, of the number of water points built per person and of quality of the provided water.
  • Access to sanitary installations: latrines, bathing and washing facilities, all in sufficient quantity, again above the Sphere standard’s requirements.

As well, their hygiene living conditions, awareness and practices has been improved: people were able to attend hygiene promotion education sessions and each family received a kit including soap, washing powder, brushes and water recipients.

An account from Francisco

Coming from eastern East Timor, Francisco Alves Maria is 38 years old. Although he could not study after high school under the Indonesian occupation, a water supply company trained him on the job. A Timorese NGO, also a partner of Triangle, taught him how to implement projects through a community approach, close to the people of his country.
Since June 2007 he assists Triangle's team in the implementation of a water and sanitation project supporting internally displaced people in Dili district.

Three answers

« What do you think of the impact that this project can have on IDPs? »
«Before IDPs were leaving in tents so this change to Transitional Shelter Sites (TSS) is fine for Timorese families who are used to live together. Even if shelters are too small, it is a good solution for a short period of time. »

« From your site visits, what is your opinion about IDP's reaction towards the project? »
« IDPs want to move in TSS because standard is good, even if there is not enough space. Some people I met were trying to get a house in TSS but they were refused because of the too many number of families already living in. »

« And what about their willingness to go back home? »
« People came from districts to go to the first camps and then to TSS. Because of security problems and promises not fulfilled by the Government, people don't dare going back home and want to stay in the TSS. There are lots of reasons for them not to go back home, for example, the jealousy and tensions created when, in a same area, some families still have a house whereas neighbours have had their house burnt down. »

Rehabilitation, maintenance and management of rural water supply systems in Manututo District for the Government of East Timor

For Triangle, the objective is to realise a thorough evaluation of the existing situation in order to propose a system to support the long term sustainability of all the rural schemes within Manatuto District.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 6 months (July to Decem. 2007)
 Budget: K€ 58

 Funding

UN
  • Funding: French Embassy in Jakarta, Government of East Timor

The objective for the Government of Timor is that all rural water supply schemes within a District are fully functioning, properly managed and have an external support system that ensures sustainability.

For Triangle, the objective is to realise a thorough evaluation of the existing situation in order to propose a system to support the long term sustainability of all the rural schemes within Manatuto District.

This project is the first phase of a larger programme which will last several years (phase 2 would last 3 years). This first phase of 6 months will produce the following results:

  • A detailed review of all existing rural water supply schemes within Manatuto District,
  • Common guidelines for the management of all water supply systems within the district,
  • Proposals for establishing a system to support the long term sustainability of all the rural schemes within the District utilising DNAS national and district staff,
  • A three year plan and budget for:
    - Returning damaged schemes to full working order, and
    - Implementing the other proposals,
  • A list of risks and assumptions associated with the proposals,
  • Proposals for monitoring and benchmarking individual scheme reliability and the effectiveness of the District level management support.

A second phase of 3 years of which the content will be discussed at the end of phase 1, is likely to include the following objectives and results:

  • All existing rural water supply schemes fully rehabilitated and functioning,
  • Water management groups functioning and supported in all communities receiveing a formal water supply,
  • An external support system for rural water supplies established and fully operational utilising DNAS (National office for water and sanitation) services and staff,
  • Monitoring and benchmarking scheme functioning and effective throughout the District,
  • Report or project activities, results, lessons learned and proposals for future improvements and activities.

Building of a water supply system in the villages of Laclo, in Manatuto district

The overall objective of the project is to provide access to good quality and sufficient quantity of water for the population of 4 villages of Laclo sub district.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 2 418 people
 Duration: 6 months (March to oct. 2007)
 Budget: K$ 131

 Funding

UN
  • Funding: UNDESA (United Nations Department for Economical and Social Affairs)

TGH implements this project in partnership with UNDESA and the Timorese organisation CPT (Centre Pupuh-Ira Timor). The activities undertaken are:

  • Technical assistance, support and general supervision of the project,
  • Procurement and installation / rehabilitation of 4 water networks (pipes, tap stands, connections…),
  • Water quality testing,
  • Training of key-persons.

Supply Potable Water and Sanitary Facilities in Areas Affected by Malnutrition in Laleia Sub-District

Our aim was to reduce malnutrition by giving the population of Laleia sub-district a durable water supply and appropriate access to sanitary facilities.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 3 900 people
 Duration: 12 months 11/2005 - 10/2006
 Budget: K€ 247

 Funding

Logo ECHO
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid Department of the European Commission)
  • Creation of waterworks: drilling, pumping, reservoir building,
  • Installation of water system (public fountains…),
  • Construction of 150 latrines,
  • Hygiene-awareness campaigns and distribution of hygiene kits,
  • Creation of "Water Committees" to manage the infrastructures,
  • Creation of vegetable patches for the inhabitants.

Emergency Water and Sanitation in Camps for Displaced People

In partnership with UNICEF, Triangle worked in 35 displaced persons camps in the capital of Timor Leste, Dili. The program focused on creating water points, latrines and showers.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures


 Duration: 2 months (July to August 2006)
 Budget: K$ 12

 Funding

UNICEF
  • Funding: UNICEF (Fond des Nations Unies pour l’enfance

These camps grew spontaneously or were implemented by the UNHCR following conflicts between the various armed forces – a situation that obliged over 100,000 people to flee their homes.

Last updated February 12, 2015