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Programmes

Yemen

With its experience in Iraqi Kurdistan, in partnership with UNHCR, the association decided in early 1998 to provide assistance to Somali refugees fleeing civil war and taking refuge in Yemen.

For seven years, Triangle Génération Humanitaire has developed programmes for refugees, including social and educational support, the creation of income-generating activities and the improvement of sanitation infrastructures. Over that period of time, TGH also contributed to the construction of a new site offering improved reception conditions.

Subsequently, many projects have been implemented in various regions of the country, mainly focusing on water and sanitation and food security.

At the end of 2010, when political unrest, still shaking the country today, erupted in Yemen, TGH was operating in five regions through the implementation of emergency programmes (Governorate of Hajjah), rehabilitation programmes (Governorate of Hadramout) and Rural Development programmes (Governorates of Hodeida and Shabwa, on the Island of Socotra).

In May 2011, three expatriate employees of TGH were the victims of a kidnapping that has deprived them of their liberty for nearly six months. Since then, TGH's activities in Yemen have been limited to a single programme, and other project opportunities are currently under study. TGH's operating conditions in Yemen, now adapted to the current context, underwent lasting change.

Completed Programmes

Integrated food security project - Districts of Al Rawdah and Jardan - Governorate of Shabwah

This program aims to help increase food production through the construction or rehabilitation of protection structures against floods and spate irrigation.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 26 500 people
 Duration: 36 months 05/2011 - 04/2014
 Budget: €1.660.000

 Funding

 Yemen Liquefied Natural Gaz (YLNG)

  • Funding: Yemen Liquefied Natural Gaz (YLNG)
  • Partners: Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation

Yemen is one of the low-income food-deficit countries (LIFDCs). 40% of the population is undernourished, mainly because of the limited resources of households that do not allow them to buy food. In addition, rural areas bear the consequences of policies that have encouraged intensive agriculture at the expense of local agriculture. According to the World Food Programme (WFP - 2010), 32% of the Yemeni population is affected by food insecurity (one in three is undernourished), 12% of the population is in a state of severe food insecurity, and one child under 5 years out of ten is affected by acute malnutrition, often transmitted by his mother (25% of women in age to reproduce are malnourished).

Most other indicators related to poverty (83% of the rural population live below the poverty line) are dramatically significant: access to drinking water (32% in rural areas) or access to sanitation facilities (23% in rural areas).

The two districts of Mayfaah and Rudoom are among the most affected in terms of food insecurity. The area targeted is isolated and characterized by the poverty of its population and its dependence on agriculture, livestock and fishing. The geographical, climatic and environmental conditions are particularly difficult and add to the lack of government action on health and education, as well as to the low economic development of the area.

This program aims to help increase food production through the construction or rehabilitation of protection structures against floods and spate irrigation

Rehabilitation of canals

  • Conducting a baseline survey on the current strategies of production and land use;
  • Rehabilitation of damaged canals and of water points in some villages;
  • Assistance and monitoring of grain and forage production strategies, of productivity and increase in land use.

Livestock 

  • Improving animal health of the livestock of small farmers through better veterinary services;
  • Training and technical support  to farmers on basic veterinary skills and on the use of basic drugs;
  • Optimized feeding of the livestock of small farmers, through the integration of breeding and agricultural production;
  • Improving the management of the herds of small farmers, and the profitability of animals through training and supply of small equipment.

Agriculture

  • Running of a baseline survey;
  • Community information and mobilization around the project’s objectives;
  • Monitoring of the agricultural activity in the farms selected within the target area;
  • Experimenting on improved forage and other seeds commonly used.

Development and promotion of a socially and ecologically friendly agriculture on the Island of Socotra

Extending its previous project, TGH continues to provide a proximity support to the groups of market gardeners in Socotra, and follows the products’ marketing as well as the duplication of local seeds.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire

 Key figures

 Duration: 36 months 01/2009 - 12/2011
 Budget: K€715

 Funding

Logo AFD
  • Funding: AFD (Agence française de développement)

It is true that the Island of Socotra offers climatic and natural conditions totally suitable to this type of project, however, the advanced protection of this rich and fragile environment imposes a strict control on farming practices, and, as it is the case in the whole Republic of Yemen, an advanced mastering of the means of irrigation.

Expected results:

  • To foster the increase in the production of fruits and vegetables in the Island of Socotra on a long-term basis
  • To strengthen local capacities in terms of organization and development of new paths
  • To favour Socotran seeds, a biological agriculture and improved nutritional practices

The island of Socotra is located 400 km south of the Yemenite coast. Its climate is characterised by weak and fairly unpredictable rainfall. A season of violent winds, lasting from June to September, provokes the departure of many islanders for a period of two to three months. The activities of TGH also slow down during that time. The majority of the island’s 55 000 inhabitants live in the coastal plains and around the capital, Hadibo. Protection of Socotra’s biodiversity, highly specific and particularly rich, is one of the priorities of the Yemenite government and must be central to all local development actions.

Triangle G H started implementing diversified projects in Socotra in August 2000. Since then, it has witnessed the speed of the island’s opening towards the rest of the world. Over recent years, tourism has grown at phenomenal rate, and various infrastructures, especially roads, have markedly improved.

Facing the necessity to raise the level of food safety on the island, domestic production being insufficient (family breeding of goats or sheep, a few date palm enterprises), the Yemenite authorities have favoured large-scale projects such as massive irrigation works, often to the detriment of village or domestic production projects. In the context of Socotra, where few inhabitants still work as farmers, TGH, with support from AFD, has decided to develop collective market gardening projects run by women-volunteers living in the same village.

To implement sustainable gardens with the women involved, the programme unrolls in the following way:

  1. Identification of potential sites with the communities interested in the project

    TGH approaches the communities through their traditional chiefs. In this way, each garden is anchored locally and it is possible to make contact with the community’s women, an aspect that isn’t always easy complicated in Yemen. Once the land has been identified and its potential confirmed (soil quality, location in relation to houses, irrigation possibilities), the women who wish to participate in the project attend the first information meetings.

  2. Organisation of irrigation, assisted by the villagers

    Having evaluated the garden’s irrigation opportunities, Triangle’s technical teams install the right structure to water future crops. In Socotra, water is rare, so the aim is to either to dig a well and reach underground water, or to build a small dam upstream of the nearest river. By using gravity, water from the dam is then fed into a large-capacity reservoir in the garden itself. This kind of technical planning is covered by Triangle’s technical team, with strong input from the beneficiaries. A few local technicians are then trained to maintain the straightforward systems and guided through the works phase by TGH.

  3. •Land preparation, seed distribution and technical training for the women involved

    During a number of successive meetings with the women involved, TGH’s agronomists (organic farming experts) teach land preparation techniques. Each woman prepares and cultivates her own garden plot. Naturally, the women are supplied with seeds, predominantly from local cultures, before cultivating their plants according to the advice and meteorological recommendations made during training.

  4. Guidance over two or three agricultural seasons

    All through the programme, TGH visits every garden to observe the plots’ development. As well as helping the women solve any problems they have with their crops, future training requirements can also be identified and organised according to the women’s wishes. This training/guidance method operates through regular visits to each garden and draws on the Triangle’s technical expertise; indeed, the agronomists test the variety of seeds and collect information to define appropriate fertilizers and natural anti-parasites that can be made locally by the women, at very lost cost.

  5. Participative implementation of solutions to sell excess produce

    Throughout the programme, TGH encourages family usage of the yield so that both adults and children can benefit from increased consumption of fresh vegetables. As the women generally produce more than is needed by their families, they share their crops around them and sometimes sell part of it if the market is not too far away. The remoteness of certain sites reduces significant commercial profit, but others, namely the Shok garden near Hadibo, supply the main market. The women have imposed their presence on the market over time and some restaurants even include Socotra-grown vegetables in their menus (up to now they had to import them at a higher rate).
    Regardless of the commercial opportunities of each garden, TGH assists each woman gardener and helps her find appropriate solutions to her needs.

Towards the restoration of the farming productive capacities of households, the improvement of practices and a mitigation of the impact of the rise in the prices of foodstuff

The valley of Tareem has been particularly struck by the floods in October 2008, as was the valley of wadi Sah.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 25 months 01/2010 - 12/2011
 Budget: K€1.258

 Funding

Logo EuropeAid-commission-europeenne
  • Funding: EuropeAid (European Commission)

During the first intervention in this second valley, TGH helped restore cultivated lands. Towards the end of 2009, thanks to funding from the European Commission and a partnership with the local organisation, Wadi Hadramout Development Project (WHADP), TGH launched a programme developing global agricultural production in Tareem valley. This both supported and accompanied reconstruction initiatives already launched by local actors. The programme’s objectives are described below.

  1. Restore access to agricultural land

    Owing to the amount of uprooted date palms and the piles of rubble and stones borne by the flood, it was essential to start by clearing and levelling the land. Thus, before launching agricultural activities, the loaders and trucks from a private firm contracted by TGH, cleared, levelled and protected from erosion (protection of gabion banks) 732 hectares of land.

  2. Restore access to irrigation water

    Traditional Hadramout irrigation structures (small dams, canals, deviations) are used in most of the region’s valleys. Through such systems, part of the wadi waters can be directed to agricultural lands that are not near rivers. Floods destroyed a major part of these infrastructures, preventing control or deviation of water towards agricultural areas. TGH worked with the WHADP engineers and villages involved to identify and size the infrastructures to rebuild or repair. Extensive works were carried out in over fifteen sites, allowing 1984 farming families to benefit anew from access to water and irrigating 2395 hectares.

  3. Improvement of production capacities

    To improve the farming produce and raise production capacity, a variety of seeds selected specifically for the region will be distributed to the poorest families in Tareem and Sah valleys. 1132 families shall benefit from these distributions and cultivate approximately 1260 hectares.

  4. Improvement of natural resources management

    Water resources, fairly rare in Yemen, are deteriorating. Some regions are already threatened in the medium term. Saving water and promoting good practices for water usage are consequently one of the primordial challenges for Yemen’s development, especially within the agricultural sector.

This is why TGH offers farmers in the region equipment and training dedicated to saving water for irrigation of lands devoid of canals. Such lands are irrigated via wells equipped with electric pumps. 240 farmers will be trained in “responsible irrigation techniques”. 15ha will be equipped with drop-to-drop systems, an experimental initiative.

Integrated Food Safety in Marawah district, Hodeidah Governorat

Based on a definition of the concept of food security allying food consumption and state of health – a definition stemming from the work of the World Food Security Committee

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 42 months 01/2008 - 05/2011
 Budget: K€1 700

 Funding

Logo EuropeAid-commission-europeenne
  • Funding: EuropeAid (European Commission), and Co-sponsor to be identified

TGH together with "Aide Médicale Internationale", each association within its specific field of expertise, carry out a joint action towards the populations of the Tihama plains, one of the poorest areas in the Republic of Yemen.

Expected results:

  • The exploitation of the natural resources used for farming is improved on a long-term basis
  • The farming strategies of subsistence are supported
  • The access to quality basic healthcare is strengthened on a long-term basis

TGH and Aide Médicale Internationale are conducting a comprehensive food-safety program for the rural populations of Wadi Siham. Each NGO runs actions according to its specific skills.

Aide Médicale Internationale (AMI), in the process of rehabilitating health centers with the Health Ministry, provides training courses in nine health centers and runs two mobile clinics to bring health services to remote groups living far from the area's main population pools. As well as optimizing access to primary health care, this project involves prevention and treatment of malnutrition.

In turn, TGH is running three complementary aspects of the program:

  1. Improvement of farming practices and production

    The agriculturists of TGH work in 15 villages in the districts targeted by the project. They work daily with the farmers who want to take part in the tests and guide them through the benefits and disadvantages of new agricultural methods, together with the yield of introduced varieties. TGH, with the support of local multiplication centers and local representatives of the Yemenite Agricultural Ministry, present the farmers with varieties that have shorter cycles, allowing farmers to face a reduced rain period and optimize the use of water in the region. Several varieties of local cultures (tobacco, margosa, sorghum, fodder) are thus tested and distributed if successful. Meetings inviting farmers from different villages foster the exchange of agricultural practices.

  2. Improvement of animal production

    Impoverished people with small herds (ovine, goats) populate the 24 villages where Triangle G H is active. The animals are raised for milk and meat that form a major portion of each family's capital. Improvement of breeding practices and the diffusion of large-scale, basic veterinary services helps to increase the volume of animal production.

    The breeding team of TGH has also carried out training courses that are open to women in every village. The courses focus on identification and treatment of the most common animal diseases. Two women per village are in charge of the basic stock of medication that they can renew thanks to payment received for their treatment of animals. Treatment covers the most common diseases in the region (1,600 users and over 16,250 treatments in 2009).

    TGH also offers volunteer-breeders the possibility of purchasing, at a reduced rate, food supplements that strengthen the animals. This allows breeders to sell such animals at a higher price; the average net gain according to initial studies is €5 per head sold at €50. It goes without saying that this food protocol is managed by agriculturists and explained in detail to each breeder participating in the project. One of the main levers for optimizing feed-related practices in the area is to develop clover culture. Indeed, clover consumes less water than alfala, a crop that is over-cultivated in the region. In addition, having observed that major quantities of fodder are wasted when scattered on the ground (feed stamped into the soil or mixed with excrements), Triangle has implemented feeding-bowls. The actual gain generated by implementation of feeding-bowls is currently being calculated.

  3. Promotion of good practices of hygiene

    In the 24 villages targeted by the program, TGH is developing the knowledge and practices linked to personal and environmental hygiene. A simple training method targeting men and women (in separate sessions), based on active participation has been implemented. Subjects covered were defined following analysis of an initial survey of the practices in the targeted area. This work was performed in close cooperation with Aide Médicale Internationale that spreads complementary messages to the population. The community health agents trained by AMI are informed about Triangle's action in the hygiene & health area.

Integrated economic security project in the districts of Mayfaah and Rudoom, governorate of Shabwah

The still delicate stability of the Governorate of Shabwah is one of the avatars of the area’s economic decline. TGH intervenes within the frame of a three-year project in order to establish improved farming practices and help boost declining agricultural and animal production.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Wash

 Key figures

 Beneficiaries: 25 000 agriculteurs
 Duration: 30 months 01/2009 - 06/2011
 Budget: K€444

 Funding

 YLNG (Yemen Liquefied Natural Gas)

  • Funding: YLNG (Yemen Liquefied Natural Gas)

Over 25,000 famers directly benefit from this program.

Expected results:

  • The animal production is improved
  • Thanks to the rehabilitation of damaged irrigation channels, the cereal and fodder production is improved
  • The support brought to the production of dates and market gardening products enables the improvement and the diversification of the means of subsistence of the families, as well as of their food habits.

The targeted area features several types of agro-ecological conditions so it is necessary to adapt them to the activities and techniques implemented during the program.

Local animal production is on a net rise thanks to the training and guidance offered to breeders of small livestock herds. Application of basic animal care (breeders trained in diagnosis and animal care, veterinarian agents trained, distribution of medication) significantly improves the herd's state of health. Among other elements, the integration of improved agricultural techniques optimises the use of feed, increases the animals' price of sale and the families' revenue (less expenditure on fodder, sale of larger and healthier animals).

The choice of adapted varieties, along with access to water via land irrigation improve fodder production. Thus, TGH teams are currently rehabilitating wells and canals in the aim of improving water distribution in the plots. The technical choices (pump types, fodder variety, etc.) approved take into account reasonable and optimized consumption of water resources – a crucial issue in Yemen.

Emergency support to victims of the conflict in North Yemen

TGH continues its operations, launched in 2009, for IDPs in Al Mazraq area. While return movements were initiated in 2010, a number of families have stayed in the camps, and do not wish to return to their original villages.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 12 months 06/2010 - 05/2011
 Budget: K€600

 Funding

Commision Europeenne
  • Funding: ECHO (European Commission Humanitarian Relief Department)

We are therefore running actions to soften the IDPs' integration, while supporting efforts to return home. Triangle provides displaced families and IDPs with veterinarian services to protect the health of their small herds. We also supply fodder to the poorest households and, in partnership with OXFAM, will rebuild hydraulic infrastructures destroyed by shelling (end of 2009 start of 2010).

Despite a secessionist attempt by the South in 1994, the Republic of Yemen's unification was achieved in 1990, however the country remained shaken by substantial internal political tensions and social issues. The beginning of 2009 was marked by the recrudescence of stormy demonstrations in South Yemen, followed by the arrest of political opponents and the cancellation of legislative elections in April. The conflict in Saada governorate singularly reflected Yemen's fragility. Government forces have been battling « Al Houti » rebels (named of their historical leaders) intermittently ever since September 2004. In a climate of ongoing tension, with sporadic fighting, the country has already suffered five wars and various mediation attempts have failed to provide a peaceful solution. The sixth war began in April 2009.

The civilian population was once again directly exposed to the conflict. Facing immediate and heightened danger, thousands of families fled the combat zones and had to endure multiple displacements according to the conflict's escalation and geographical dispersion. To date, the United Nations agencies have formerly registered 150,000 Internally Displaced People (IDP). Fleeing Saada and Amran areas, families have made their way north-west (towards Saudi Arabia), south-west to Hajjah governorate, and east (Al Jawf)

It was in this context, that Triangle conducted technical assessments in October 2009 in Haradh area. The surveys highlighted, among other points, the acute decapitalization process of the displaced families that had recently arrived. Most of the IDPs used to be farmers in mountain areas and traditionally own around 30 to 35 animals (sheep and goats, some cows and a donkey). They are not professional breeders in the sense that they do not raise an income from their herds, however the animals are an important part of these people's assets: the herd can provide some cash flow should problems arise. For example, a goat is sold when a person need expensive medical care. In other words, the herds represent a form of security for the households.
War, displacement and current settlement in camps around Al Mazraq have severely weakened the animals, seriously endangered the households' source of revenue and exacerbated sanitary conditions.

The main objective is to:

Improve the living conditions of conflict-affected populations from Northern Yemen displaced in Al Mazraq area, particularly by slowing down the decapitalization process among displaced families, and improving access to drinking water for populations returning to their original villages.

In particular:

Slow down the decapitalization process among displaced families and improve their access to drinking water in Al Mazraq area

Expected results:

  • The IDPs' remaining livestock asset base is secured
  • Displaced persons living in outside settlements and residents of the targeted areas have improved access to drinking water

Towards restoring the farming capacities of the communities living in the district of Sah, Governorate of Hadramout.

In the direct continuity of the first rehabilitation programme also supported by TEPY, TGH is still committed to the cause of the populations living on the banks of wadi Sah, the victims of exceptional floods in October 2008.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 12 months 06/2009 - 05/2010
 Budget: K€532

 Funding


 TEPY
 (TOTAL Exploration and Production Yemen)

  • Funding: TEPY (TOTAL Exploration and Production Yemen)

The restoration of the farming land and of the totality of the major structures (channels, dams, dykes), enabling the irrigation of the parcels under cultivation, was achieved during the first phase, and the operations of support to breeding activities are currently being implemented.

Expected results:

  • The communities of wadi Sah have retrieved access to channelled irrigation
  • Irrigation capacities are back to normal
  • The most vulnerable breeders have reconstituted their flocks

Emergency relief for displaced people in Al Mazraq, Hajjah Governorat

Despite the peace agreement signed between the Al Houtis rebels of Saada Province and the Yemenite government, the sixth war triggered further displacement of vulnerable people Al Mazraq refugee camp.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire

 Key figures

 Duration: 3 months 04/2010 - 06/2010
 Budget: K€150

 Funding

Logo MAE
  • Funding: Crisis Center (French Ministry of Foreign Affairs)

TGH maintained its work (launched in November 2009 thanks to the support of the United Nations agency for Refugees) with the 1,400 households - owning some 19,000 animals – in the camps.

For the humanitarian actors in this area, the stakes consisted in implementing a "combined programme". On one hand, the programme must continue providing basic services for families lacking the means to return to their villages; on the other, it must help those who wish to leave the camps. Regarding the latter, we aimed to maintain the level of food safety and foster the socio-economical exchanges that previously existed in the villages affected by the conflict.

In partnership with the actors in the field, and thanks to its knowledge of the area, TGH counted the amount of returnees and adapted its work according to the movement of people towards their home villages. It was crucial, for instance, to keep the returnees’ livestock alive, while supporting the families who decided to go home.

Our strategy was to adjust the aid provided to beneficiaries according to the "communicating vessels" system. Indeed, it is always important not to oppose the dynamics of return, without harboring a situation of dependency on foreign relief which could create a reason in itself to stay in the camps.

Emergency support to the displaced populations in Al Mazraq, Governorate of Hajjah

Where as the sixth war of the conflict which has been opposing the Al Houtis rebels of the North to the Yemeni government since 2004 intensifies, the flow of displaced civil populations continues unceasingly.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire

 Key figures

 Duration: 5 months 11/2009 - 03/2010
 Budget: K€254

 Funding

Logo UNHCR
  • Funding: UNHCR (the United Nations Refugee Agency)

TGH carried out two assessments to better target the needs uncovered by the emergency actors present in the area. Priority was given to the support of the flocks. The livestock of each family represents the totality of the economic capital left over after the destruction or the desertion of the houses following the bombings. Besides, this intervention helps to reduce the sanitary risks linked to the promiscuity between men and animals in the camps.

Expected results:

  • Veterinary care is provided to the entire livestock belonging to the displaced population
  • Fodder and food nutriments are distributed to all the displaced families owning flocks
  • Separated shelters are built for the animals within camps 1 and 3.

Further Development of Irrigated Agriculture on the Island of Socotra

This new project, incorporated in Triangle's action on the island of Socotra, involves two new areas: Qalansiya (at the north-west point of the island) and the Nogud Plain (south of the island).

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 24 months 01/2007 - 12/2008
 Budget: K€300

 Funding

Logo MAE
  • Funding: French Ministry of Foreign Affairs
    Conseil Général du Puy de Dôme, France

Our aim is to improve the local communities’ eating habits, thereby the islanders’ nutrition, by:

Périmètre irrigué

Irrigated area
Photo : TGH

  • Developing new irrigated market gardening areas (according to the model implemented for our previous project in Socotra) and strengthening the abilities of the local offices attached to the Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation
  • Implementing a forestry polyculture plantation system based on ancestral knowledge and on the date palm, in Nogud. This region has the advantage of presenting clay loam soil and important resources of water which is essential for this kind of culture
  • Promoting biological, ancestral and new cultivation techniques, enabling good water management and the diversification of food crops to improve the nutrition/health situation on the island

Conducted in respect for the exceptional fauna and flora of Socotra, this project is a partnership with the INRA (National Institute for Agronomical Research) that will be providing its expertise to achieve better impact in terms of nutrition.

Supply Drinking Water and Improve Sanitary Conditions in Lahej Governorate

This programme is designed to meet the water and hygiene needs of 10,296 people living in 17 villages in the districts of Al Museimer, Al Madareba, Al Ara and Tor al Baha, all located in a sub-desert area of the Lahej gouvernorat.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 16 months 01/2006 - 04/2007
 Budget: K€525

 Funding

Commision Europeenne
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid Department of the European Commission)

We have created new water points, ensuring 35 litres per person at least, and reducing the time required to access water.

We have also built family latrines and performed several hygiene-awareness campaigns optimising the project’s impact on beneficiaries.

Stimulation of Infant Development in Dar Al Sa’ad District, Governorate of Aden

Dar Sa'ad is one of Aden's eight districts and among the poorest; some 80,000 people live there, mainly members of vulnerable communities – Somali and Ethiopian refugees, "Akhdam" groups, Yemeni families with very low income.

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 Area of expertise

Psycho-Social

 Key figures

 Duration: 7 months 06/2006 - 12/2006
 Budget: K€31

 Funding

UNICEF
  • Funding: UNICEF (Fonds des Nations Unies pour l'Enfance)

In Dar Sa’ad, Triangle has partnered with local organisations to improve people’s understanding of infant development and encourage good caring habits. Our activities include:

  • Information and awareness sessions aimed at the general public, in particular mothers
  • Training sessions about child development issues for social workers and group leaders working in the district
  • Action aimed at delivery of birth certificates to enable children’s school entrance when applicable.

Development of Market-Garden Crops on the Island of Socatra

This programme, launched in November 2004, aims to increase the production of fruit and vegetables in secluded villages on the island of Socotra and thus improve the islanders' nutritional status and food safety.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire

 Key figures

 Duration: 26 months 09/2004 - 12/2006
 Budget: K€320

 Funding

Logo MAE
jardins-potagers-Socotra

jardins potagers
Photo : TGH

  • Funding: French Ministry of Foreign Affairs
    United Nations Development Program, The Embassy of Japan

Triangle has created family vegetable gardens in remote areas of the island, developed and diversified vegetable production around the capital and introduced new market-garden techniques and cultures that fully respect the ecosystem.

Activities include creation of pilot nurseries on the southern coast and eastern plateau, testing of new vegetable and fruit varieties, optimization of cultivation techniques and production of seed and plants.

Assistance to Somali and Ethiopian Refugees

This aid programme for Somali and Ethiopian refugees was renewed annually from 1998 to 2005.

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 Area of expertise

Psycho-Social

 Key figures

 Duration: 1998 - 2005
 Budget: US$298

 Funding

Logo UNHCR UNICEF
  • Funding: UNHCR (UN Refugees Agency)
    UNICEF (United Nations Children's Fund)

Our work in Kharaz camp and Basateen district (Aden) was mainly social, with two approaches:

Social assistance
Two teams of social workers based in the camp and in Basateen regularly visited people identified as "very vulnerable" (children without family, isolated, elderly or disabled people) to provide specific help (food, hygiene equipment, etc.) and direct them towards the appropriate services (administration, hospitals, etc).

Community work
Our main aim was to encourage refugees to become actors, not passive recipients of welfare schemes. Thus, throughout 2005, we worked in community centres (in Kharaz and Basateen), offering various activities: vocational training (sewing, weaving, basket-making, etc), educational courses (English, Arabic and Somali language courses and Information Technology), leisure (games, video room, library, etc.) and sports. We also developed community vegetable gardens and implemented a nursery for children in Basateen.

Furthermore, Triangle worked on AIDS prevention in Basateen.

Research Project: Water and Sanitation Requirements of Vulnerable Communities in Dhala, Taiz and Lahej Governorates.

This research project, performed in close partnership with two NGOs named Dia and Coopi, had two objectives: improve the definition of priority needs in terms of water and sanitisation; plan future projects for vulnerable populations in the three governorates.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 3 months 03/2005 - 05/2005
 Budget: K€50

 Funding

Commision Europeenne
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid Department of the European Commission)

The study took place in the Dhala, Taez and Lahej governorates and involved 53,827 people living in 101 villages.

It focused on two aspects:

  • The first was socially-oriented and enabled a participative, community approach
  • The second, more technical, had the aim of defining appropriate intervention plans.

Beyond the results gathered and the recommendations given, this study is to serve as a reference basis for all organisations working in Yemen on water and sanitation.

Supply Drinking Water and Improve Sanitary Conditions in the Wadi Masila

The Wadi Masila is an isolated and forgotten area in East Yemen where the natural and climactic conditions are particularly hostile.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 12 months 03/2004 - 02/2005
 Budget: K€388

 Funding

Commision Europeenne
  • Funding: ECHO (European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office)

By installing equipment in 26 sites this programme brought permanent and safe access to drinking water for 9,780 people from mainly Akhdam communities.

1.541 people, including 83 women and 1.331 children, were directly impacted by our hygiene-awareness campaign.

In addition, a pilot project building latrines and installing solar-powered cookers was implemented. While the latrine project showed fairly disappointing results, the supply of solar-powered cookers had a very positive impact and an in-depth evaluation has been proposed in the framework of a future programme.

Rehabilitation of Agricultural Infrastructures

The region of Hadramaout, located east of Yemen suffers from regular flooding. Triangle first intervened in 1999 to protect agricultural land and villages against floods and ground erosion while developing the irrigation system.

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 Area of expertise

Agro-Secu-Alimentaire Génie-Civil

 Key figures

 Duration: 24 + 24 months 11/1999 - 10/2003
 Budget: K€1.200 + K€1.920

 Funding

Logo EuropeAid-commission-europeenne
  • Funding: EUROPEAID (European Union Cooperation Agency)

The construction of irrigation pools and retaining walls also helped improve soil fertility.

A second phase was launched in March 2002: we developed our action in other communities of the region and reached some 70,000 people. We opened access to 700 ha of land and protected 24.000 palm trees against erosion. These works also led to refilling the groundwater levels.

This programme was realised, as was the first phase, in partnership with one of the Ministry of Agriculture departments, the WHAPD (Wadi Hadramaout Agriculture Project Development). It fully involved the local communities who performed the works.

This programme was developed in 2 phases each lasting twenty-four months and resulted in the following:

Phase one :

  • Construction/rehabilitation of 130 structures on 97 sites,
  • Improvement of traditional irrigation over 1339 ha of cultivated land,
  • Irrigation of 343 ha of land,
  • 20 villages and 355 ha of cultivated land protected against seasonal floods

Phase two:

  • Construction/rehabilitation of 146 structures in 117 sites,
  • Irrigation of 27800 palm trees thanks to new infrastructures,
  • 260 ha of land irrigated anew (irrigation had stopped in 1999),
  • Improvement of the irrigation system across 2236 ha of cultivated land,
  • 50 ha of cultivated land irrigated non-stop throughout the year,
  • 300 ha of land made farmable again,
  • 12 villages, 24,000 palm trees and 700 ha of cultivated land protected against floods,
  • Groundwater refilled by 100.000 to 200.000 m³ per year.

Socotra, an Island between Two Worlds

Directed by Didier Dematons, this 52-minute documentary presents the mechanisms allowing populations to benefit from the humanitarian aid granted by the European Union.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 8 months 10/2002 - 05/2003
 Budget: K€145

 Funding

Commision Europeenne
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid Department of the European Commission)

"Socotra, une île entre deux mondes" was filmed in Brussels, where ECHO has its headquarters, and in Socotra, an island located on the coast of Yemen where Triangle worked with the population to collect, store and distribute water.

Rehabilitation of the Waterworks System on the Island of Socotra

Draught, flooding and other severe climatic events have severely damaged the Socotra archipelago, and in response to the European Commission’s Master Plan, we launched rehabilitation and construction of the potable water system in several villages of the Diksam, Momi and Riyad Ilkishin in 2000 and 2001.

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 Area of expertise

Wash

 Key figures

 Duration: 10 months 07/2000 - 04/2001
 Budget: €210.000

 Funding

Commision Europeenne
  • Funding: ECHO (Humanitarian Aid Department of the European Commission)

Witnessing the urgent need for drinking water in the isolated areas of Nogud, Qara’a and Mayhah, we launched a second phase in 2001. This action, concluded in April 2002, benefited some 11,195 Bedouin inhabitants.

This programme fully respected the traditional methods and encouraged a participative community approach.